Edvard I. Moser

Norwegian University of Science and Technology


Election Year: 2014
Primary Section: 28, Systems Neuroscience
Membership Type: Foreign Associate

Biosketch

Edvard Moser is a Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. He is interested in how spatial location and spatial memory are computed in the brain. His work, conducted with May-Britt Moser as a long-term collaborator, includes the discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex, which provides clues to a neural mechanism for the metric of spatial mapping. Subsequent to this discovery the Mosers have identified additional space-representing cell types in the entorhinal cortex and they are beginning to unravel how the neural microcircuit is organized. Edvard Moser received his initial training at the University of Oslo under the supervision of Dr. Per Andersen. He worked as a post-doc with Richard Morris and John O’Keefe in 1996, before he accepted a faculty position at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology the same year. In 2002 he became the Founding Director of the Centre for the Biology of Memory. In 2007 the Centre became a Kavli Institute. Edvard Moser is also Co-Director of the newly established Centre for Neural Computation at the same institution. Together with May-Britt Moser, he has received a number of awards, including the 2014 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology.

Research Interests

I am interested in neural network computations in the cortex, with particular emphasis on dynamic representation of space and memory in the hippocampal-entorhinal system. I have studied how spatial location and spatial memory are computed in the brain. My most noteworthy contribution is the discovery of grid cells in the entorhinal cortex, which points to the entorhinal cortex as a hub for the brain network that makes us find our way. Together with many colleagues, and in particular my long-term collaborator May-Britt Moser, I have shown how a variety of functional cell types in the entorhinal microcircuit contribute to representation of self-location and how the outputs of this circuit are used by memory networks in the hippocampus. We have shown that the grid-cell network is organized in modules and we have found parts of the mechanisms for the interaction between grid cells and geometrical features of the local environment. The discovery of grid cells and their control of population dynamics in the hippocampus have led to a revision of established views of how the brain calculates self-position and spatial mapping and is becoming one of the first non-sensory cognitive functions to be characterized at a mechanistic level in neuronal networks.

Powered by Blackbaud
nonprofit software