Shaul Mukamel

University of California, Irvine


Election Year: 2015
Primary Section: 14, Chemistry
Secondary Section: 13, Physics
Membership Type: Member

Biosketch

Shaul Mukamel is a Distinguished Professor at University of California, Irvine, received his PhD in 1976 from Tel Aviv University and has held faculty positions at Rice University, the Weizmann Institute, and the University of Rochester. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America and a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. He had pioneered the development of coherent multidimensional spectroscopy techniques which span the infrared to the x-ray spectral regimes. His density matrix computational framework based on "Liouville space pathways" and his popular textbook "Principles of Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy (1995) had created a unified approach for the design and interpretation of ultrafast spectroscopic signals in molecules. He had employed these techniques to study energy and electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes, excitons in semiconductor nanostructures and the secondary structure of proteins. Recent applications include attosecond stimulated Raman x-ray spectroscopy, and utilizing the quantum nature of optical fields and photon entanglement to obtain novel spectroscopic information that is not accessible with classical light.

Research Interests

Shaul Mukamel's laboratory is interested in the design of novel ultrafast multidimensional coherent optical spectroscopies for probing and controlling electronic and vibrational dynamics in large molecules in the condensed phase; spectroscopy with quantum optical fields utilizing the quantum nature of optical fields and photon entanglement to achieve temporal and spectral resolutions not possible with classical light. Attosecond nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy of molecules; Many-body theory of molecular nanostructures, chromophore aggregates and semiconductor nanoparticles; Long range electron transfer, energy funneling, and collective nonlinear optical response of  biological light harvesting complexes; Photon statistics in single molecule spectroscopy; develop a density matrix framework based on "Liouville space pathways" for the design and interpretation of ultrafast spectroscopic signals. He had employed these techniques to study energy and electron transfer in photosynthetic complexes, excitons in semiconductor nanostructures and the secondary structure of proteins.

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