Jeremy A. Sabloff

Santa Fe Institute


Election Year: 1994
Primary Section: 51, Anthropology
Membership Type: Member

Biosketch

JEREMY A. SABLOFF (B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1964; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1969), an archaeologist, is an External Professor, Emeritus and Past President of the Santa Fe Institute and Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, of the University of Pennsylvania.  He has taught at Harvard University, the University of Utah, the University of New Mexico, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Pennsylvania (where he was the Williams Director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum from 1994-2004).  He also was an Overseas Visiting Fellow at St. John's College, Cambridge, England.

He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (elected in 1994) and the American Philosophical Society (elected in 1996), and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (elected in 1999). He also is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, London and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  He was the American Anthropological Association's Distinguished Lecturer in 2010.  He received the Society for American Archaeology's inaugural Award for Excellence in Latin American and Caribbean Archeology in 2011 and the Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014.  He also received the Lucy Wharton Drexel Medal from the University of Pennsylvania Museum in 2014 and the Alfred Vincent Kidder Award for Eminence in the Field of American Archaeology from the American Anthropological Association in 2016.

He is the author/co-author and editor/co-editor of over two dozen books and monographs. His principal scholarly interests include: ancient Maya civilization, the rise of complex societies and cities, the history of archaeology, and the relevance of archaeology in the modern world.

Research Interests

My principal research interests include archaeological theory and method; the history of archaeology; the development of complex societies; preindustrial cities; settlement pattern studies; and Precolumbian civilizations, especially the ancient Maya.

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